Daily Prompt: The Power of Touch

I’m a cat lover. An unapologetic cat lover at that. I never used to be. When I was a kid I was allergic to cats and avoided them like the plague. Then, in my early thirties I came upon an abandoned three week old kitten and my heart went out to him. Still, I wasn’t interested in adopting him, so much as helping him find a good home. The funny thing was, he picked me. Cats often do this, though I used to think it was malicious, the way they would pick out the one who was sure to sneeze and break out in hives. No, this guy kept climbing up my leg and sitting on my shoulder until I broke down and took him home with me. From then on I was hooked. You could almost call me a cat lady. I’ve had as many as four cats at one time in my house, something I vowed I would never do. I have a cousin who has always had at least six cats and sometimes three dogs, all at the same time, and I used to think there was something seriously wrong with her. I almost ended being just like her. Scary thought!

Fast forward twenty years and I went from four cats to two. I’m on the attrition plan now. I have one cat, a Bombay, which is a black cat. This species of cat is very affectionate and they love to be touched, which is great because I love to touch. He will sit in my lap for hours if I let him, just petting and touching him. He’s so soft and warm, that even when he comes close to me, I reach out and touch.
I also love the new microfibers for their luxuriant softness. I can’t resist reaching out and just running my fingers through the material. I love the softness of a baby’s newborn skin and the top of an infant’s head. When my children were babies, I would often just hold them and stroke the tops of their heads.
I love a good hug as much as the next person, but give me something soft to snuggle up in and I’m a goner.

 

Angela Moody lives in Vermont with her husband and two children and two cats. She is an unpublished writer of historical fiction.

Where Did That Word Come From?

Today’s word is: A Capella. Where did that word come from? It’s from the Italian meaning: In the manner of the chapel or choir. The word Cappa is from Latin and means cap or cloak. There was a chapel that kept the cloak of St. Martin and was known as the “capella.” Now the word means to sing without music and gained popularity with the Do Wop bands of the 1950s and Barbershop quartets. To use it in a sentence it would go something like this: My family runs and hides whenever I start singing a capella!

Where Did That Word Come From?

Every once in a while I get a word stuck in my head and I repeat it over and over. Then, I start wondering where it came from and why we use it. So in that vein I’m going to post a different word that has been incorporated into the English Language but came from a foreign one.

 

Today’s word is: A Capella. Where did that word come from? It’s from the Italian meaning: In the manner of the chapel or choir. The word Cappa is from Latin and means cap or cloak. There was a chapel that kept the cloak of St. Martin and was known as the “capella.”

Now the word means to sing without music and gained popularity with the Do Wop bands of the 1950s and Barbershop quartets.

To use it in a sentence it would go something like this: My family runs and hides whenever I start singing a capella!

Daily Prompt: Now You See Me

My fantasies have always been about going back in time to either watch an event unfold that fascinates me, like Gettysburg in July 1863, or to give some valuable “feedback” about what their decisions will culminate in down the road.

I’ve been reading a lot lately about World War I and if I could go back to any time, I think it would be Versailles 1918. I would encourage the victors not to be so hard on the vanquished, that it will only cause conflict that they will have to deal with again 25 years later. I would encourage them to start the League of Nations and not to antagonize Germany and Japan. Would my words have any effect? Probably not, but it would be fun to see what would happen.